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This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience while browsing it. By clicking ‘Got It’ you’re accepting these terms. It’s thought to have originated in China more than 2,000 years ago. Back then, fermentation was one of the methods used to keep foods from spoiling quickly. Sauerkraut survived the test of time to become a popular side dish and condiment in many cultures. It’s especially appreciated in Germany, where its name comes from. Due to the fermentation it undergoes, sauerkraut offers nutrition and health benefits far beyond those of fresh cabbage. This article outlines 8 health benefits of sauerkraut and provides a step-by-step guide for how to make your own. Sauerkraut contains many nutrients important for optimal health. One cup (142 grams) provides (2Trusted Source): Sauerkraut is particularly nutritious because it undergoes fermentation, a process during which microorganisms on the cabbage digest its natural sugars and convert them into carbon dioxide and organic acids. Fermentation starts when yeast and bacteria that are naturally present on the cabbage and your hands, as well as in the air, come into contact with the s...

The Best Dairy-Free Probiotic Supplements + Essential Label Reading Tips

This is the flagship post in our dairy-free probiotics section, which I will continue to update. Finding dairy-free probiotic supplements used to be a challenge, but these days there are quite a few options. Technically, probiotics themselves are free of all food. They’re live bacteria and yeasts that occur naturally in our digestive tracts. But two primary food issues can arise with probiotic supplements. Supplements often contain fillers, binders, and other types of ingredients to bulk them up and create a functional pill. Getting live bacteria to our guts without a transport system would be next to impossible. But these ingredients can include food, like dairy. Most of the time it’s lactose (milk sugar), but other dairy ingredients might be used. Nonetheless, the ingredients should be clearly visible on the label. And the probiotics themselves must be grown on a medium. This is often dairy. The bacteria is removed from the medium, and in theory shouldn’t be problematic for most people with a dairy issue. The bacteria itself doesn’t contain properties, like proteins, of the dairy it was grown on. However, there can be a concern for trace cross-contamination, and vegans might o...